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Temporary Exhibitions 2008

For 2008, the following exhibitions were shown:

Horner Collection and Farming in Bowland exhibitions

NB: there is a talk involving the Horner collection on 27 Nov 2008: please see: Talks at Museum in November

Horner Collection

Hard on the heels of Annie Farrer's enormously successful exhibition of paintings, there follows 'something completely different'. We are delighted to be able to display, on loan from the Craven Museum, 24 photographs from the Horner Collection, together with further examples donated to us by the Horner family. These portray events, landscapes, buildings and people in different areas of North Craven, spanning a period of about 100 years. We are very grateful to Mrs Jean Jelley and her family for allowing us to dedicate the exhibition to the memory of Ken Jelley, a greatly-valued Folly volunteer and highly-accomplished photographer who took over the Horners' business in 1961 and ran it until his retirement in 1997. Some examples of the collection are below: images are copyright, and courtesy of Mrs Jean Jelley:

 

Duke Street, Settle: mist creating an atmospheric image of this central steet in the town (© 2008) (JPG, 51Kb)
Duke Street, Settle: mist creating an atmospheric image of this central steet in the town.

  Ebbing and Flowing Well, Giggleswick, 1885: A cyclist from Barnoldswick takes a breather beside this local feature which can still be seen alongside the B6480 at the foot of Giggleswick Scar (© 2008) (JPG, 53Kb)
Ebbing and Flowing Well, Giggleswick, 1885: A cyclist from Barnoldswick takes a breather beside this local feature which can still be seen alongside the B6480 at the foot of Giggleswick Scar.

  Anthony Horner with his portable dark room.  He used an early form of processing called wet collodion (© 2008) (JPG, 63Kb)
Anthony Horner with his portable dark room. He used an early form of processing called wet collodion.

 

Farming Life and Farmsteads in the Forest of Bowland: an exhibition about the work of the Slaidburn Village Archive and the Yorkshire Vernacular Buildings Study Group

Alongside this is an important display designed by Heritage Trust for the North West, entitled 'Farming Life and Farmsteads in the Forest of Bowland', which is about the work of Slaidburn Village Archive and the Yorkshire Vernacular Buildings Study Group who have visited and recorded the history of a number of farm buildings in the vicinity of the Hodder Valley. The exhibition also contains fascinating illustrations of some of the historic farmsteads further afield, around Settle and Bentham, together with old farm implements from the collections of North Craven Building Preservation Trust and Heritage Trust for the North West.

Poster for Bowland Exhibition (JPG, 57Kb).  Click on the image for larger view in new browser window (817Kb)
Poster for Bowland Exhibition
click on the image for a more detailed view
(JPEG, opens in new browser window, 817kb)

More information on the Yorkshire Vernacular Buildings Study Group may be found on their website at: http://www.yvbsg.org.uk/

 

Annie Farrer: Plant Forms on Paper: a Fresh Approach (21 March - 6 May)

Our first exhibition of 2008 will run from 21 March to 6 May and is of paintings by Annie Farrer, one of the country's foremost botanical artists, who grew up in Clapham. Annie has recently begun experimenting with different techniques and methods of working and her Folly exhibition, entitled Plant Forms on Paper: a Fresh Approach provides a first opportunity of seeing some of her new work.

'My paintings are a bit like snorkelling!' So says Annie Farrer, one of the country's foremost botanical artists. Her analogy refers to the high degree of precision required in observing and representing the parts of a plant, sometimes down to a fraction of a millimetre, for the purposes of botanical identification. 'There is a whole new world to be found when you look closely into a leaf or flower and you never look at vegetation in quite the same way again'.

 

Annie Farrer (32Kb)
Annie Farrer

Annie has pursued a freelance career, working frequently for the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew, the Royal Horticultural Society and in many parts of the world, contributing to numerous books and journals and illustrating specialist monographs. She has received a number of major awards and exhibited widely at home and abroad. Her work is well represented in international and private collections.

As a child, Annie grew up at the heart of the most spectacular limestone scenery in Yorkshire, in a house filled with the paintings, photographs and writings of Reginald Farrer, the great plant collector and 'Father of Rock Gardening' who wandered the slopes of Ingleborough in his own childhood. The world of botany and exploration was her natural environment, and in 1977 she won a Churchill Fellowship to travel overland to the Himalayas to draw for a book Flowers of the Himalaya. Thus began a great love for the region to which she has returned 25 times during the last 15 years.

 

Arisaema griffithii var. pradhanii (14Kb)
Arisaema griffithii var. pradhanii

Working in the south of France in 1998, gave Annie the chance of stepping outside the traditional English approach to painting plants, an experience which she found very liberating. She discovered greater choice in what to paint, for example a torn leaf or a single tendril in its own right. She became very interested in Chinese calligraphy and the idea of 'negative space', i.e. the blank space around an image. This led to a desire to experiment with new ways and techniques of working.

A course taught - outside and sometimes in the rain - by Malham-based artist, Katharine Holmes in the summer of 2007, has further inspired Annie to break away from some of her previous methods of painting, not least in her choice of materials and the scale of her work. The Folly exhibition thus represents an important period of transition for Annie. As she herself says, 'I do not want to leave detail behind, but to show it in new ways. The pictures in this exhibition are the beginnings of a new direction for me, using my experience over years of precision to reveal that there is a lot more in front of your eyes than you ever thought'.

Annie Farrer (45Kb)
Annie Farrer

 

Some images of the forthcoming exhibition are below:

Arisaema candidissimum (27Kb)
Arisaema candidissimum
Native to China. Flowers June/July. approx 30 cms

 

Arisaema speciosum (21Kb)
Arisaema speciosum
Grows at altitudes of 2,400-3,500 metres in the Himalayas

 

Arisaema griffithii var. pradhanii (19Kb)
Arisaema griffithii var. pradhanii
Grows at altitudes of 2,300-3,300 metres in the Himalayas

 

Extract: Bramble - Rubus fruticosus (52Kb)
Extract: Bramble - Rubus fruticosus
Bramble leaves and dried grass. The old road to Newby Cote. I have chosen the most dramatic autumn-coloured bramble leaves I could find - they are rarely this bright. I left out the stems because I wanted them to float against the paler grey background

 

Extract: Geranium pratense (43Kb)
Extract: Geranium pratense
Leaf in autumn colour. The old road to Newby Cote. I have fully painted the central area, putting less paint and 'randomly' less or more colour towards the margin

 

Annie Farrer is teaching a course in June and September 2008 at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew on Botanical Illustration: please see arts.htm for more information.

The Museum of North Craven Life in the Folly has in previous years hosted an exhibition of the work of Reginald Farrer (2003) and exhibited work by Katharine Holmes as part of the 'Connections: Artists and Writers in North Craven' (2006): see below for details.


Temporary Exhibitions for other years may be found by clicking on the relevant links below:

 


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